DK

                                                         International Music Therapy / DJ Services - Muscle/Fitness - New Media Network - Career DevelopmentMetaPhysical Library - Portal - Spiritual Evolution 

BLOG

Earth - Home - Biom - Reality - Mythology - The Moral Of The Story Through Etymologies

Posted on August 15, 2016 at 5:35 AM

The Greek word γαῖα (transliterated as gaia) is a collateral form of γῆ[4] (gē, Doric γᾶ ga and probably δᾶ da)[5] meaning Earth,[6] a word of uncertain origin.[7] R. S. P. Beekes has suggested a Pre-Greek origin.[8] It, however, could be related to the Avestan word gaiia 'life;' cf. Av. gaēθā '(material) world, totality of creatures' and gaēθiia 'belonging to/residing in the worldly/material sphere, material'; or perhaps Av, gairi 'mountain'.[citation needed]

In Mycenean Greek Ma-ka (trans. as Ma-ga, "Mother Gaia") also contains the root ga-.[9][10]


In Greek mythology, Gaia (/ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/ from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē, "land" or "earth"[1]) also spelled Gaea, is the personification of the Earth[2] and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia is the ancestral mother of all life: the primal Mother Earth goddess. She is the immediate parent of Uranus (the sky), from whose sexual union she bore the Titans (themselves parents of many of the Olympian gods) and the Giants, and of Pontus (the sea), from whose union she bore the primordial sea gods. Her equivalent in the Roman pantheon was Terra.[3]

Category:Offspring of Gaia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Offspring of the Greek major earth goddess Gaia.

This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total.

C► Cyclopes‎ (9 P)► Furies/Erinyes‎ (4 P)

► Gigantes‎ (13 P)

► Rhea‎ (1 C, 2 P)

► Titans‎ (1 C, 33 P)

Category:Furies/Erinyes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Were female chthonic deities of vengeance; they were sometimes referred to as "infernal goddesses" (χθόνιαι θεαί). A formulaic oath in the Iliad invokes them as "those who beneath the earth punish whosoever has sworn a false oath"

 

In Greek mythology the Erinyes (/ɪˈrɪniˌiːz/; sing. Erinys /ɪˈrɪnɪs/;[1] Greek: Ἐρῑνύες [ῠ], pl. of Ἐρῑνύς [ῡ], Erinys),[2][3][4][n 1] also known as the Furies, were female chthonic deities of vengeance; they were sometimes referred to as "infernal goddesses" (χθόνιαι θεαί). A formulaic oath in the Iliad invokes them as "those who beneath the earth punish whosoever has sworn a false oath".[8] Burkert suggests they are "an embodiment of the act of self-cursing contained in the oath".[9] They correspond to the Dirae in Roman mythology,[10] and some suppose that they are called Eumenides in hell, Furiae on earth, and Dirae in heaven.[11][12]

According to Hesiod's Theogony, when the Titan Cronus castrated his father Uranus and threw his genitalia into the sea, the Erinyes as well as the Meliae emerged from the drops of blood when it fell on the earth (Gaia), while Aphrodite was born from the crests of sea foam.[13] According to variant accounts,[14][15][16][17] they emerged from an even more primordial level—from Nyx ("Night"), or from a union between air and mother earth.[18] Their number is usually left indeterminate. Virgil, probably working from an Alexandrian source, recognized three: Alecto or Alekto ("endless"), Megaera ("jealous rage"), and Tisiphone or Tilphousia ("vengeful destruction"), all of whom appear in the Aeneid. Dante followed Virgil in depicting the same three-character triptych of Erinyes; in Canto IX of the Inferno they confront the poets at the gates of the city of Dis. Whilst the Erinyes were usually described as three maiden goddesses, the Erinys Telphousia was usually a by-name for the wrathful goddess Demeter, who was worshipped under the title of Erinys in the Arkadian town of Thelpousa.

Hermes (/ˈhɜːrmiːz/; Greek: Ἑρμῆς) is an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, and the second youngest of the Olympian gods (Dionysus being the youngest).

Hermes is considered a god of transitions and boundaries. He is described as quick and cunning, moving freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine. He is also portrayed as an emissary and messenger of the gods;[1] an intercessor between mortals and the divine, and conductor of souls into the afterlife. He has been viewed as the protector and patron of herdsmen, thieves,[2] oratory and wit, literature and poetry, athletics and sports, invention and trade,[3] roads, boundaries and travelers.[4]

Maia[1] (/ˈmeɪ.ə/ or /ˈmaɪ.ə/; Greek: Μαῖα; Latin: Maia), in ancient Greek religion, is one of the Pleiades and the mother of Hermes.

Maia is the daughter of Atlas[2] and Pleione the Oceanid,[3] and is the eldest of the seven Pleiades.[4] They were born on Mount Cyllene in Arcadia,[5] and are sometimes called mountain nymphs, oreads; Simonides of Ceos sang of "mountain Maia" (Maiados oureias) "of the lovely black eyes."[6] Because they were daughters of Atlas, they were also called the Atlantides.[7]

 

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Maia embodied the concept of growth,[11] as her name was thought to be related to the comparative adjective maius, maior, "larger, greater." Originally, she may have been a homonym independent of the Greek Maia, whose myths she absorbed through the Hellenization of Latin literature and culture.[12]

In an archaic Roman prayer,[13] Maia appears as an attribute of Vulcan, in an invocational list of male deities paired with female abstractions representing some aspect of their functionality. She was explicitly identified with Earth (Terra, the Roman counterpart of Gaia) and the Good

Goddess (Bona Dea) in at least one tradition.[14] Her identity became theologically intertwined also with the goddesses Fauna, Magna Mater ("Great Goddess", referring to the Roman form of Cybele but also a cult title for Maia), Ops, Juno, and Carna, as discussed at some length by the late antiquarian writer Macrobius.[15] This treatment was probably influenced by the 1st-century BC scholar Varro, who tended to resolve a great number of goddesses into one original "Terra."[16] The association with Juno, whose Etruscan counterpart was Uni, is suggested again by the inscription Uni Mae on the Piacenza Liver.[17]

The month of May (Latin Maius) was supposedly named for Maia

Bona Dea ("The Good Goddess") was a divinity in ancient Roman religion. She was associated with chastity and fertility in women, healing, and the protection of the Roman state and people. According to Roman literary sources, she was brought from Magna Graecia at some time during the early or middle Republic, and was given her own state cult on the Aventine Hill.

Maia, designated 20 Tauri (abbreviated 20 Tau), is a star in the constellation of Taurus. It is the fourth brightest star in the Pleiades open star cluster (M45), after Alcyone, Atlas and Electra, in that order. Maia is a blue giant of spectral type B8 III, and a mercury-manganese star.

Maia's visual magnitude is 3.871, requiring darker skies to be seen. Its total bolometric luminosity is 660 times solar, mostly in the ultraviolet, thus suggesting a radius that is 5.5 times that of the Sun and a mass that is slightly more than 4 times solar.[4] It was thought to be a variable star by astronomer Otto Struve. A class of stars known as Maia variables was proposed, which included Gamma Ursae Minoris, but Maia and some others in the class have since been found to be stable.[4]

Maia is one of the stars in the Maia Nebula (also known as NGC 1432), a bright emission or reflection nebula[7] within the Pleiades star cluster.

Ah-Muzen-Cab -- Mayan god of bees.

Austėja -- Lithuanian -- goddess of bees.

Bhramari -- Hindu goddess of bees.

Bubilas -- Lithuanian -- god of bees.

Melissa -- Ancient Greek/Minoan -- goddess of bees.

Mellona -- Roman goddess of bees.

Colel Cab -- Mayan goddess of bees.

Bee (mythology)

USS Aristaeus (ARB-1)

Some modern sources, such as James Mellaart, Marija Gimbutas and Barbara Walker, claim that Gaia as Mother Earth is a later form of a pre-Indo-European Great Mother, venerated in Neolithic times. Her existence is a speculation, and controversial in the academic community. Some modern mythographers, including Karl Kerenyi, Carl A. P. Ruck and Danny Staples interpret the goddesses Demeter the "mother," Persephone the "daughter" and Hecate the "crone," as aspects of a former Great goddess identified by some[who?] as Rhea or as Gaia herself. In Crete, a goddess was worshiped as Potnia Theron (the "Mistress of the Animals") or simply Potnia ("Mistress"), speculated[by whom?] as Rhea or Gaia; the title was later applied in Greek texts to Demeter, Artemis or Athena. The mother-goddess Cybele from Anatolia (modern Turkey) was partly identified by the Greeks with Gaia, but more so with Rhea and Demeter.

Modern ecological theory[edit]

Main article: Gaia hypothesis

The mythological name was revived in 1979 by James Lovelock, in Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth; his Gaia hypothesis was supported by Lynn Margulis. The hypothesis proposes that living organisms and inorganic material are part of a dynamical system that shapes the Earth's biosphere, and maintains the Earth as a fit environment for life. In some Gaia theory approaches, the Earth itself is viewed as an organism with self-regulatory functions. Further books by Lovelock and others popularized the Gaia Hypothesis, which was widely embraced and passed into common usage as part of the heightened awareness of environmental concerns of the 1990s.

See also[edit]

Greek mythology portal

Hellenismos portal

Aditi

Atabey (goddess)

Bhumi

Dewi Sri

Earth Mother

Gaia hypothesis

Gaia philosophy

Great Mother

Mother Nature

Tellus Mater

Terra (mythology)

The Seven Deadly Sins of Modern Times (painting)

Titan

Modern ecological theory

Main article: Gaia hypothesis

In ancient Roman religion and myth, Tellus Mater or Terra Mater ("Mother Earth") is a goddess of the earth. Although Tellus and Terra are hardly distinguishable during the Imperial era,[1] Tellus was the name of the original earth goddess in the religious practices of the Republic or earlier.[2] The scholar Varro (1st century BC) lists Tellus as one of the di selecti, the twenty principal gods of Rome, and one of the twelve agricultural deities.[3] She is regularly associated with Ceres in rituals pertaining to the earth and agricultural fertility.

The attributes of Tellus were the cornucopia, or bunches of flowers or fruit. She was typically depicted reclining.[4] Her male complement was a sky god such as Caelus (Uranus) or a form of Jupiter. A male counterpart Tellumo or Tellurus is mentioned, though rarely. Her Greek counterpart is Gaea (Gē Mâtēr),[5] and among the Etruscans she was Cel. Michael Lipka has argued that the Terra Mater who appears during the reign of Augustus is a direct transferral of the Greek Ge Mater into Roman religious practice, while Tellus, whose temple was within Rome's sacred boundary (pomerium), represents the original earth goddess cultivated by the state priests.[6]

The word tellus, telluris is also a Latin common noun for "land, territory; earth," as is terra, "earth, ground". In literary uses, particularly in poetry, it may be ambiguous as to whether the goddess, a personification, or the common noun is meant.

This article preserves the usage of the ancient sources regarding Tellus or Terra.

Tela Telos Telomeres He-Man

Ceres (mythology)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Seated Ceres from Emerita Augusta, present-day Mérida, Spain (National Museum of Roman Art, 1st century AD)

In ancient Roman religion, Ceres (/ˈsɪəriːz/;[1][2] Latin: Cerēs [ˈkɛreːs]) was a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly relationships.[3] She was originally the central deity in Rome's so-called plebeian or Aventine Triad, then was paired with her daughter Proserpina in what Romans described as "the Greek rites of Ceres". Her seven-day April festival of Cerealia included the popular Ludi Ceriales (Ceres' games). She was also honoured in the May lustratio of the fields at the Ambarvalia festival, at harvest-time, and during Roman marriages and funeral rites.

Ceres is the only one of Rome's many agricultural deities to be listed among the Dii Consentes, Rome's equivalent to the Twelve Olympians of Greek mythology. The Romans saw her as the counterpart of the Greek goddess Demeter,[4] whose mythology was reinterpreted for Ceres in Roman art and literature.[3]

Agricultural fertility[edit]

Ceres was credited with the discovery of spelt wheat (Latin far), the yoking of oxen and ploughing, the sowing, protection and nourishing of the young seed, and the gift of agriculture to humankind; before this, it was said, man had subsisted on acorns, and wandered without settlement or laws. She had the power to fertilise, multiply and fructify plant and animal seed, and her laws and rites protected all activities of the agricultural cycle. In January, Ceres was offered spelt wheat and a pregnant sow, along with the earth-goddess Tellus at the movable Feriae Sementivae. This was almost certainly held before the annual sowing of grain. The divine portion of sacrifice was the entrails (exta) presented in an earthenware pot (olla).[7] In a rural context, Cato the Elder describes the offer to Ceres of a porca praecidanea (a pig, offered before the sowing).[8] Before the harvest, she was offered a propitiary grain sample (praemetium).[9] Ovid tells that Ceres "is content with little, provided that her offerings are casta" (pure).[10]

Ceres' main festival, Cerealia, was held from mid to late April. It was organised by her plebeian aediles and included circus games (ludi circenses). It opened with a horse-race in the Circus Maximus, whose starting point lay below and opposite to her Aventine Temple;[11] the turning post at the far end of the Circus was sacred to Consus, a god of grain-storage. After the race, foxes were released into the Circus, their tails ablaze with lighted torches, perhaps to cleanse the growing crops and protect them from disease and vermin, or to add warmth and vitality to their growth.[12] From c.175 BC, Cerealia included ludi scaenici (theatrical religious events) through April 12 to 18.[13]

 

The Dii Consentes, also as Di or Dei Consentes (once Dii Complices[1]), was a list of twelve major deities, six gods and six goddesses, in the pantheon of Ancient Rome. Their gilt statues stood in the Forum, later apparently in the Porticus Deorum Consentium.[2]

The gods were listed by the poet Ennius in the late 3rd century BC in a paraphrase of an unknown Greek poet:[3]

Juno, Vesta, Minerva, Ceres, Diana, Venus,

Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Neptune, Vulcan, Apollo

Livy[4] arranges them in six male-female pairs: Jupiter-Juno, Neptune-Minerva, Mars-Venus, Apollo-Diana, Vulcan-Vesta and Mercury-Ceres. Three of the Dii Consentes formed the Capitoline Triad: Jupiter, Juno, and Minerva.

GAEA (Gaia) - Greek Goddess of the Earth (Roman Terra, Tellus)

www.theoi.com/Protogenos/Gaia.htmlProxy Highlight

GAIA (Gaea) was the goddess of the earth. She was one of the primoridal elemental deities (protogenoi) born at the dawn of creation. Gaia was the great mother ...

Gaea - Riordan Wiki - Wikia

riordan.wikia.com/wiki/GaeaProxy Highlight

Gaea (also spelled as Gaia) is the primordial Greek goddess of the Earth, and the main... ... and her former husband is Ouranos. Her Roman counterpart is Terra.

Gaea - Greek Mythology

www.greekmythology.com/Other_Gods/Gaea/gaea.htmlProxy Highlight

Gaea was a primal Greek goddess, one of the deities that governed the universe before the Titans. ... Gaea Is also called Terra, Gaia, Gi, Ge. See Also: Titans ...

Gaia (Terra) - Shmoop

www.shmoop.com/gaia-terra/Proxy Highlight

Learning Guide and Teacher Resources for Gaia (Terra) written by PhD ... and that's definitely the case for our lady: she was also known as Gaea or Ge by the ...

GAIA ( Terra, Gaea, Ma-ka, Great Mother, Mother Nature, Earth ...

https://www.pinterest.com/eluneadore/gaia-terra-gaea-...Proxy Highlight

In Greek mythology, Gaia also spelled Gaea, was the personification of the Earth[ 2] and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia was the great mother of all: the ...

https://www.startpage.com/do/asearch

Categories: Dragonfly Kingdom International Service Agency: North East Nature Guard, New England True Sustainability Initiative, Springfield Green Team Partnership: Site Updates, Blog And Improvements-www.DragonflyKingdom.com/bsa or www.DragonflyKingdom.com/apps/blog, Self Improvement - Spiritual Evolution - Transcendence - (B.S.S.I), U.I. Adventures, Origins and Exploration

Post a Comment

Oops!

Oops, you forgot something.

Oops!

The words you entered did not match the given text. Please try again.

Already a member? Sign In

0 Comments